Tulip Armchair - Fiberglass

Starts from $555.00 Regular Price $619.00
Only %1 left

We offer free shipping for orders over $1000

Learn More

We offer 1-year warranty coverage on our products

Learn More

No-hassle returns accepted within 14 days of delivery

Learn More

Free shipping

Learn More

Extensive Warranty

Learn More

Easy Return

Learn More
  • The innovative Tulip Chair is an organic and ergonomic piece of design history. The world's first one-legged chair, the Tulip Chair changed the future of furniture design when it was introduced in the late 1950s. Echoing the curves of the human body, its sweeping fiberglass frame offers supreme comfort and support.This is further accentuated by the padded upholstery, available in up to seven colours. The unique pedestal base provides stability as well as a distinctive aesthetic, and can be swivelled.

    Material & Feature:
    • Premium Solid fiberglass shell with white and black high-gloss finish
    • Seat cushion upholstery in grey cashmere fabric (C.O.M available)
    • Cast aluminum base resistant to chipping and flaking
    • 360 degree swivel
    • All materials are non-toxic (Baby friendly)
    Dimensions:
    • Width: 27.27" x Depth: 22.44" x Height: 32"
    • Seat Width: 18.5" x Depth: 17.52" x Height: 18.5"

    * All measurements are approximations.
  • Finnish-American Eero Saarinen (1910 - 1961) was famous for varying his style according to the demands of the project. His father taught at the Cranbrook Academy of Art, where Eero took classes and formed relationships with fellow student Florence Knoll. Saarinen studied sculpture at the Acadmie de la Grande Chaumire in Paris, France, and later at the Yale School of Architecture, completing his studies in 1934. He joined the US Military, where he was assigned to draw illustrations for bomb disassembly manuals and to provide designs for the Situation Room in the White House. He founded his own office in 1950, after his father's death. His first success, the"Tulip Chair" was produced by the Knoll company, beginning a long relationship between Knoll and Saarinen. While still working for his father, he won the design competition for the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in St. Louis, aka the Gateway Arch.