Dark Walnut Wood Tulip Dining Table - Round

Reproduction
Starts from $1,299.00 Regular Price $1,555.00
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  • The best part about contemporary Tulip Table design interpretations is that you can take small liberties with the original design. And the best way to do that is by playing a little with the materials. So the Dark Walnut Wood Tulip Dining Table in round is a beautiful articulation of the original Saarinen table with a small twist. Its dark wood table-to veneer offers quality and durability. Finished with a special-surface chip resistant treatment, this table-top emulates a handsome elegance that would fit in all manner of interior design styles ranging from rustic to contemporary. Its easy assembly and distinctive design set the Dark Walnut Wood Tulip Dining Table in round apart from the rest.

    Material & Feature:
    • NEW table height: 30" (Standard dining/kitchen table height)
    • Quality, classic veneer table top
    • Built from the best materials to produce an enduring product
    • Cast-aluminum base with semi-glossy finish
    • Special surface treatment resistant to chipping with gloss finish
    • Easy Assembly
    Dimensions:
    • Size 36" - 35.43"
    • Size 40" - 40.16"
    • Size 48" - 47.24"
    • Size 52" - 51.97"
    • Size 60" - 60.24"
    • Table Height: 30"

    * All measurements are approximations.
  • Finnish-American Eero Saarinen (1910 - 1961) was famous for varying his style according to the demands of the project. His father taught at the Cranbrook Academy of Art, where Eero took classes and formed relationships with fellow student Florence Knoll. Saarinen studied sculpture at the Academie de la Grande Chaumiere in Paris, France, and later at the Yale School of Architecture, completing his studies in 1934. He joined the US Military, where he was assigned to draw illustrations for bomb disassembly manuals and to provide designs for the Situation Room in the White House. He founded his own office in 1950, after his father's death. His first success, the "Tulip Chair" was produced by the Knoll company, beginning a long relationship between Knoll and Saarinen. While still working for his father, he won the design competition for the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in St. Louis, aka the Gateway Arch.